NotaBene .

NotaBene 33(2016) :

NotaBene .

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ABSTRACT

This is the first chapter of the book on Frege's philosophy of language. The chapter reveals the private and university life of Frege, his ups and downs as a thinker and inventor of the first version of modern logic. Special emphasis is put on the episode related to the famous Russell's paradox which ended for considerable time Frege's work on logic and philosophy of arithmetic. The chapter ends with discussing the political and moral convictions and views of Frege expounded in his fam ous Diary of 1925.

Key words: Frege, Russell paradox, modern logic, logical notation, Frege's diary

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ABSTRACT

After presenting a possible classification of paradoxes in general, a particular paradox is considered in the paper. It is maintained that there are no logical fallacies in the argumentation of the paradox but rather that there is a mistake of not taking into account all possible consequences of the premises. Nonetheless the conclusion is that the problem presented by the paradox is not resolved by showing that mistake, and it is suggested that because of this the paradox should be considered very seriously and its importance is comparable with the liar paradox.

Key words: paradox, liar paradox, logical fallacy, argumentation

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ABSTRACT:

My goal in this article is to present and compare two articles, written respectively by G. E. Moore and D. Pears, with identical name Is Existence a Predicate?". First, I will try to trace the connection between the main ideas and to show whether there is continuity between them, and then to point out certain confusions and uncertainties. In conclusion, I would like to say that I think Pears was unable to refine the idea that "exists" is not the predicate, and that his thesis at best is only applicable to referential use of indexical singular terms.

Key words: Pears, Moore, predicate, referent, indexical

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ABSTRACT:

The paper addresses the question of whether Strawsons claim that ordinary language has no exact logic entails a view according to which it is in ordinary languages nature to be illogical. It is first explained where the traditional idea of an exact, language-independent logic comes from, i.e. the idea of a logic which underlies ordinary languages and governs their logical use and which lack if Strawsons assumption is right would leave ordinary languages being illogical insofar as there would be nothing to eliminate their logical imperfections. Secondly, it is shown that it is inherent to language to human language in contrast to animal ones to be logical, because language games are typically introduced, explained, learned, and played out in a practice of giving and asking for reasons , which means, so to speak, in a logical space. Thus the fact that ordinary language has no exact logic in the sense that there is no one-to-one correspondence between its (grammatico-)syntactic and its (logico-)semantic sentence forms does not exclude the possibilities for it to be used in a logical manner.

Key words: Strawson, ordinary language, logicality, logical space of reasons.

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What is this"?

Astract

The paper addresses the question of whether Strawsons claim that ordinary language has no exact logic entails a view according to which it is in ordinary languages nature to be illogical. It is first explained where the traditional idea of an exact, language-independent logic comes from, i.e. the idea of a logic which underlies ordinary languages and governs their logical use and which lack if Strawsons assumption is right would leave ordinary languages being illogical insofar as there would be nothing to eliminate their logical imperfections. Secondly, it is shown that it is inherent to language to human language in contrast to animal ones to be logical, because language games are typically introduced, explained, learned, and played out in a practice of giving and asking for reasons , which means, so to speak, in a logical space. Thus the fact that ordinary language has no exact logic in the sense that there is no one-to-one correspondence between its (grammatico-)syntactic and its (logico-)semantic sentence forms does not exclude the possibilities for it to be used in a logical manner.


Key words: metaphisics, thinking, framed feature model

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The Repressive Society and the Utopia of the Sexual and Political Liberation according Herbert Marcuse

Abstract: The article analyses Marcuse's ideas of repressive society and the power of Eros. The accent is also put on his conception of the mass culture as an ideology of industrial civilization and on the opposite vision of the high culture as one of the modes of the great refusal to the values and norms of the repressive society. The concepts of mass and high culture are analysed in the context of Marcuse's distinction of basic and surplus repression.

Keywords:repressive society, basic and surplus repression, mass culture, great refusal

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Abstract: The paper seeks to answer the question what is the space in or of haiku especially in terms of the city as a topos. The answer of this question leads to many pairs of oppositions: internal-external, conscious-unconscious, natural-artificial, sacred-profane, etc. The paper however outlines that haiku is connected to a philosophy of non-duality that is going beyond opposition. Therefore its space is unfolding on the fine gap between oppositions, in the place where the natural and the artificial, the internal and the external are smoothly transforming into each other. On the basis of different examples the paper reveals how the different plans of the inner and outer, human, urban and nature spaces communicate with each other forming the sounding, deep echoing spaces of haiku and of the eternal depths of our being.

Key words: haiku, space, non-duality

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Poiesis

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